Snohomish Hearing, Speech & Deaf Center

HSDC Seattle   Serving Clallam, Jefferson, King, Kitsap, and Snohomish counties.    1625 19th Avenue Seattle, WA 98122

HSDC Seattle
Serving Clallam, Jefferson, King, Kitsap, and Snohomish counties. 

1625 19th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122

Voice: (206) 323-5770
TTY: (206) 388-1275 
Voice Toll Free:  
(888) 222-5036
Video Phone: (206) 452-7953
FAX: (206) 328-6871
Email: seattle@hsdc.org
Website: www.hsdc.org

Deaf-Blind Service Center  Serving Deaf-Blind throughout Puget Sound and statewide through other centers.  1620 18th Ave., Suite 200 Seattle, WA 98122

Deaf-Blind Service Center

Serving Deaf-Blind throughout Puget Sound and statewide through other centers.

1620 18th Ave., Suite 200
Seattle, WA 98122


Angela TheriaultExecutive Director
Voice: (206) 323-9178
TTY: (206) 323-3644
FAX: (206) 328-8497
Video Phone: (206) 455-7932
Email: info@seattledbsc.org
Website: www.seattledbsc.org

 

Office of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (ODHH)

The ODHH serves the needs of deaf, deaf-blind, hard of hearing, speech disabled and hearing people throughout the State of Washington. The Regional Service Centers also provides information and referral to assist you in locating additional services you may need. 

Deaf-Blind

ODHH provides the following selection of services to the deaf-blind community. Please click any link below to learn more about the programs and services.

Deaf

ODHH provides the following selection of services to the deaf community. Please click any link below to learn more about the programs and services.

Hard of Hearing

ODHH provides the following selection of services to the hard of hearing community. Please click any link below to learn more about the programs and services.

Speech Disabled

ODHH provides the following selection of services to the speech disabled community. Please click any link below to learn more about the programs and services.

Hearing

ODHH provides the following selection of services to the hearing community. Please click any link below to learn more about the programs and services.

ODHH or the Regional Service Centers also provides information and referral to assist you in locating additional services you may need. Click on Resources or Regional Service Centers to view the map to locate the closest regional service center to you.

All of the information provided on this page including logo comes from the Office of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing website. & the location images above is from google maps.(updated April 17, 2018)
 

WTRS Customer Service Contact Information

WTRS Customer Service Representatives are available to answer questions, take customer commendations, complaints, or feedback. When calling about a specific incident, please provide the following information:

  • Relay Operator's identification number
  • Date
  • Time of call
  • Brief description of the complaint

To reach Washington Relay Customer Care, go to the following web link: http://www.hamiltonrelay.com/state_711_relay/state.html, 800-974-1548 V/TTY or email warelay@hamiltonrelay.com

Telecommunication Relay Services (TRS) Operator Phone Numbers

Voice feature
7-1-1 or 1-800-833-6384

Captioned Telephone Service (CTS)
7-1-1 or 877-243-2823

Hearing Carry Over (HCO) feature
1-800-833-6388

 Speech to Speech Services (STS) feature
1-877-833-6341

Text Teletype (TTY) feature
7-1-1 or 1-800-833-6388

Voice Carry-over Feature (VCO)
1-800-833-6386

Video Relay Service (VRS) and Internet-Protocol Relay (IP-Relay)

Telecommunication Relay Services-Washington Relay

Telecommunication Relay Services in Washington State is also known as Washington Relay which is a free service provided by the Washington State Office of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (ODHH) ensuring equal communication access to the telephone service for people who are deaf, deaf-blind, hard of hearing and speech disabled. This service allows hearing callers to communicate with deaf, hard of hearing, deaf-blind and speech disabled relay users and vice versa through specially trained relay operators.

Calls can be made to anywhere in the world, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year with no restrictions on the number, length, or type of calls. All calls are strictly confidential and no records of any conversations are maintained.

How does Washington Relay work?

Anyone wishing to use Washington Relay simply dials 711 to connect with a relay operator. The relay operator will dial the requested number and relay the conversation between the two callers. Either a person with a hearing loss or speech disability with specialized telecommunication equipment or a person using a standard phone may initiate a call through Washington Relay by dialing the relay number 711 or the designated 10 digit number. After dialing Washington Relay, the person initiating the call gives the desired phone number to the Washington Relay Operator, who then dials that number using another phone line. The Washington Relay Operator types the standard phone user's spoken words to the person using a specialized telecommunication equipment and voices the specialized telecommunication equipment user's text messages.

Types of Relay services offered:

  • A Captioned Telephone works like any other telephone and in addition: it displays every word the other party says throughout the conversation. CTS customers place a call in the same way they would when using a traditional phone. The captioned telephone device automatically connects to a contracted CTS provider as you dial. When the person you are calling answers, you will hear everything that he/she says, just like during a traditional phone call. You also will see and read everything that he/she says on the display screen of those few caption telephone devices that connect with CTS. There is no customer charge for using CTS itself regardless of which state the person lives in. However, CTS customers are responsible for their own in-state and out-of-state long distance calls.  
  • Standard (voice) telephone users can easily initiate calls to communicate with deaf, hard of hearing, deaf-blind and speech-disabled relay users. The relay operator types the standard telephone user's spoken words to the person using specialized telecommunication equipment and voices the relay user's text messages.

  • Hearing Carry Over (HCO) allows speech disabled users with hearing capabilities to listen to the person they are calling. The HCO user types his/her conversation for the relay operator to read to the standard (voice) telephone user.

  • Speech-to-speech services Trained relay operators serve as the speech disabled user's voice and repeat his/her responses to the called party. Washington Relay's equipment and STS relay operator training ensure that speech disabled users will be heard and understood. There may be instances where an STS user will be asked to repeat his/her message to ensure that it is relayed correctly. For more information about speech-to-speech services:
    http://www.speechtospeech.org/
    http://www.fcc.gov/cgb/consumerfacts/speechtospeech.html

  • Deaf-blind relay users often use special TTY's equipped with telebraille or large visual displays and prefer slower typing speeds to read messages. Washington Relay has a toll-free number that provides customized relay service. During these relay calls, the relay operator will type at a normal speed, but the message will come across at a rate of 15 words per minute, allowing users to achieve a more readable rhythm. Users can also request increased or decreased rates of text in increments of 5 words per minute.
  • Text Teletype (TTY) A person who is deaf, deaf-blind, hard of hearing, or speech impaired uses a TTY to type his/her conversation to a relay operator, who then reads the typed conversation to a standard telephone user. The relay operator relays the hearing person's spoken words by typing them back to the TTY user. 

  • Voice Carry-Over (VCO) allows deaf or hard of hearing users to speak directly to hearing people. When a standard telephone user speaks to you, a relay operator serves as your "ears" and types everything said to your TTY or VCO phone.VCO to TTY: The relay operator types what the VCO user says to the TTY user. Whatever the TTY user types goes directly to the VCO user's TTY or text display equipment to be read.

  • Video Relay Service (VRS),This service provides American Sign Language (ASL) users with an attractive alternative that offers them the opportunity to communicate by video conferencing, using their native language, which may be preferred over the traditional telecommunication relay service. nternet protocol (IP) based relay service is available from several IP Relay providers using your computer or mobile device connected to the internet to access IP Relay services.  Some IP Relay services are also available on AOL Instant Messaging (AIM). 

Don't Hang Up

Washington Relay is designed to connect deaf, deaf-blind, hard of hearing and speech disabled people with people and businesses that use standard (voice) telephones. Although the relay service has been in existence for more than 18 years, many people don't understand how it works. As a result, people who receive relay calls often hang up, believing the caller is a telemarketer. Thus the Don't Hang Up campaign was developed.
The goal of the Don't Hang Up campaign is to decrease the frequency of hang ups by people who are unfamiliar with relay. The campaign includes a public service announcement, as well as articles in business publications.

When you experience a hang up on a relay call, please contact Washington Relay at askwashingtonrelay@dshs.wa.gov and we will contact the business to educate them about relay services.
Consider changing the way you have your relay calls announced so instead of saying, "This is the Washington Relay Service...." you ask the relay operator to begin "This is a customer of your business calling through the Washington Relay," or "This is [your name] calling through Washington Relay." Some people have found that this kind of greeting reduces hang ups. Another option would be to ask the relay operator not to announce relay, and give the relay operator instructions as of how you'd like the call to be announced, such as "Hello, this is [your name]," however it becomes your responsibility to educate the person that you're using the relay service (as the relay operator automatically becomes the third party after you take over).

 
All of the information provided on this page including logo comes from the Washington Relay Service website. & the location images above is from google maps.
 

The Regional Service Centers of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Hearing, Speech & Deaf Center
HSDC Seattle
Serving Clallam, Jefferson, King, Kitsap, and Snohomish counties. 

1625 19th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Voice: (206) 323-5770
TTY: (206) 388-1275
Voice Toll Free:  (888) 222-5036
Video Phone: (206) 452-7953
FAX: (206) 328-6871
Email: seattle@hsdc.org
Website: www.hsdc.org

Deaf-Blind Service Center

Serving Deaf-Blind throughout Puget Sound and statewide through other centers.

1620 18th Ave., Suite 200
Seattle, WA 98122
Angela TheriaultExecutive Director
Voice: (206) 323-9178
TTY: (206) 323-3644
FAX: (206) 328-8497
Video Phone: (206) 455-7932
Email: info@seattledbsc.org
Website: www.seattledbsc.org

 

Telecommunication Equipment Distribution (TED) program

The Telecommunication Equipment Distribution (TED) program distributes specialized telecommunication equipment that enables Washington residents to have independent use of the telephone.

Equipment Options

There are several options to choose from ranging from amplified phones for people with mild to severe hearing loss, captioned telephone equipment for people who have severe to profound hearing loss as well as text telephones for people who have no hearing or are unable to speak for themselves. We also provide the Deaf Blind Communicator (DBC) for clients who are Deaf-Blind and have the ability to read Braille. In addition to the various options, we have a few ring signaling devices as well. Choices include a signaler that has adjustable volume, tone and ring patterns or a device that causes a lamp to flash on and off to indicate that there is an incoming call. Our Deaf-Blind clients can request a vibrating ring signaler that is worn like a pager so that they can be alerted to incoming calls.

Eligibility

People (ages 4 and up) who are deaf, hard of hearing, deaf-blind, or speech disabled; and live in Washington State are eligible to apply for services. The cost of equipment is based on a sliding fee scale which uses the client's annual income and family size to determine if there is a cost to the client or not. Many of our clients receive the equipment at no cost.

Application Forms

14-264  Telecommunication Equipment Distribution Application                 PDF

14-440  Non-Profit Organization Application for Reconditioned Equipment PDF

In order to receive services, the application must be filled out completely, including your income and professional's (doctor, audiologist, case manager, etc.) recommendation. Once ODHH receives your completed application, we will send an invoice telling you if there is a cost. A trainer (a state contractor who specializes in hooking up the equipment and training how to use it) will contact you to set up an appointment to install your equipment. 

Types of Equipment 

  • iPad - WiFi Only- For access to WiFi based telecommunication. iPad devices are 16GB, WiFi only Black iPads with an Otter Box protective case. Clients have the choice of the iPad Air or the iPad Mini. The devices are specifically distributed to provide telecommunication access over a WiFi network.

  • Amplified Phones- For individuals with mild to moderate hearing loss. Operates like a standard telephone. Use amplification to hear spoken conversation. Adjust volume and tone to meet specific needs. Corded models available:

    • Clarity Alto with 10 memory dial buttons - User Guide (PDF)

    • Clarity Alto Plus with caller ID and 3 memory dial buttons - User Guide (PDF)
    • Cordless model available: Clarity XLC 3.4 with caller ID and speakerphone - User Guide (PDF)

    • Accessories: Neck Loop (NKL)

  • Captioned Telephone (CAP)- CapTel® 840 phone Requirements: Connected phone line. Specifications: Amplification up to 40 dB Adjustable tone and volume Built-in Answering Machine takes voice messages with captions CapTel Phone Manuals.
  • Teletypewriter (TTY)-The Teletypewriter (TTY) allows an individual to send and receive messages by typing. Messages appear on a display screen and can also be printed on paper. Ultratec SuperPrint 4425 Manual (PDF)

  • The Remote Control Speakerphone (RCx-1000)- is a "hands-free" speakerphone for use by individuals with mobility limitations who also have a hearing loss or speech disability. User Guide (PDF). Designed for anyone with any degree of mobility and/or dexterity loss. Customize the function of the phone by attaching one or more accessories. Includes a rechargeable wireless remote control for memory scanning, dialing and answering from up to 40 feet away. Designed for use with Headphones/Microphone. Voice activated answering - just say "Hello"

  • The Lighted Ring Signaler (LRS)- is a device which causes a lamp to flash when the telephone rings. Sonic Alert TR75 Instructions (PDF)

  • The Audible Ring Signaler (ARS) is an adjustable loudness ringer that plugs into a telephone jack. Ameriphone SuperPhone Ringer SR200 Manual (PDF)

  • The Large Visual Display (LVD) is a large display screen that connects to either a TTY or VCO Phone. Individuals with low vision find the large display much easier to read than the standard TTY or VCO display. (model subject to change). Ultratec Large Display for TTY Manual (PDF)

 

 
All of the information provided on this page including logo comes from the Telecommunication Equipment Distribution (TED) program website. & the location images above is from google maps.